A Voice In The Desert - Port Maitland - Beach - Wharf Area Post Cards


This is a photo that was emailed to me from Murray Lewis, and was taken "years ago in back of the Smith's", that would be Bill Smith of Charles Street and this photo was taken from Bingay's Hill. It sets up the scene for the rest of the photos of the shore area, using the names as I can recall them from the 1950's - 60's. On the far left are some of the shore houses, then the Frost home and boat shop, next was the Churchill's home, then the Sollows store, some of the tope of the buildings of near the south wharf, and the Sollows fish buildings, then the front of the larger building owned by Frank E Davis, the co-op building (cribbage game going on the inside, if we could see it), some buildings leading yto the tide gate, then a small piece of the north wharf, next comes the roof of the Thomas fish plant, the Burgoyne house, King Frost garage and house in the front of other buildings, then the Thompson house, and on the far right the Thomas "new" storage building. Quite a shot Murray!!! thanks a bunch!!!

thanks to Bryan Smith
I wasn't sure where to put this photo, so here it is. This shows the S.S. Cobequid aground and floundering on Trinity Rock, January 13, 1914. This was the first opportunity for locals to get some "salvage", so many things were removed from this vessel, including linens, dishes, chairs, tables, etc. , almost everything that was on the vessel, including its cargo of Demerara rum. Some was given up to customs, who demanded all be given to them and later sold at auction in Yarmouth.

This is the breakwater at the turn of the century (I have seen one postmarked 1904), complete with a few sail ships. This is known as the south wharf today with a breakwater being further out from shore and a north wharf added. There are a few old wooden lobster pots (traps) in the foreground.

This is a closer look of the breakwater at about the early 1900's. I have seen one of these postmarked 1911. The lighthouse can be clearly seen through the masts of the ships near the end of the wharf.

Thanks to Bryan Smith
This photo showws a great celebration which I assume is a part of the celebration of July1, 1908. It shows some of the boats of the day, as well as the south wharf and many people. Looks like a good time was had by all.

Thanks to Bryan Smith
This is also assumed to be a photo taken during the July 1, 1908 celebrations. The boats seem a bit overloaded with not a life jacket in sight. This shows the end of the wharf and the lighthouse.

This is a postcard that we purchased on eBay a while back. It is the July 1, 1908 celebrations, but has a twist. The note on the back is sent by a Geo (I assume this to be Rev George Rackham) and says "a view of Port Maitland when my band played there first time." I think that the Historical Trails has the right facts on the band; but, in this case, the wrong year, as this postcard is postmarked 1908. This is the first band mentioned as being local to this village, and is reported to have played at the celebration aboard a fishing boat.

This is the breakwater showing both the north and south wharves(I have seen this postmarked 1912). The south wharf lighthouse is clearly visible as well as several sailing ships. The tide is about half with the beach and people on it (can you believe the long dresses) are quite clear.

Thanks to Bryan Smith
This is the almost the same shot as the previous card, except the angle is slightly different and the tide is high with a sea on. It shows both the north and south wharves(. The south wharf lighthouse is clearly visible as well as several sailing ships.

Thanks to Bryan Smith
This shows some gas pumps that look to be on the north wharf. The photo is labeled as gas pumps belonging to Perry and Saunders, 1930. Some of the inner harbour buildings can be seen in the background of this photo.

This is the breakwater on a stormy day in the early 1900's. It shows some of the white caps and waves breaking for quite a way out past the wharf and one big wave breaking over the wharf near the lighthouse.

Thanks to Bryan Smith
This is the harbour before the tide gate was constructed. It is a poor quality image, but seemed to be at the first of the gas engine age, as this is mentioned on the print. the north and south wharves can be seen here as well as the breakers on the beach side of the wharf.

This is the harbour, as seen in the 1920's or 30's as a guess. All the boats have converted to gas engines. The north wharf is on the right, with the south wharf being in the background, with one of the many secondary wharves. Note the piles of wooden lobster traps on the wharves. This picture would be taken on the tide gate going over the water and separating the inner harbour (the other side of the tide gate) from the outter harbour as seen here.

Thanks to Bryan Smith
This is the inner harbour, with a sailing ship in the foreground, and the buildings on the south side of the inner harbour showing what a busy place this was at that time. On the right side is the opening where the tide gate now is, but was not present in this photo.

Thanks to Bryan Smith
This is the inner harbour, with a sailing ship on the south side, and showing the buildings on the from a different angle than the previous photo. On the right side is the opening where the tide gate now isand the north wharf and beach area showing up quite good.

Thanks to Bryan Smith
This is the inner harbour, taken in 1958. It shows the tide gate and the Thomas fish processing plants from the water side. It was probably taken from the bridge. The raw processing was done in the lower building, the taller one being the smokehouse. The one on the far right was where the smoked herring were weighed, packaged and boxed. It also shows the wharf area for the plant. There are two other buildings and the old tide gate.

Thanks to Bryan Smith
This is the inner harbour, taken in 1958. Walter Thomas with a client posing with a client for his deep sea fishing business. This was taken at the Thomas wharf, showing a clear shot out the harbour as well as the tide gate and the road south of the tide gate.

This is a secondary wharf in the harbour, showing the wharf with its pulleys and some smoke houses in the background, used for the smoking of herring and the making of finnin haddie (smoked haddock). This is a rare scene with not much indication as to the year, a guess would be the 1930's.

Thanks to Bryan Smith
This photo shows the main shore area probably about the 1920's, as the boat seems to have a motor and a cud area. The wharf with the building on it, on the far left is , I think, the building that my grandfather used to manage. This is before the Norman Sollows wharf and buildings were built.

Thanks to Bryan Smith
This photo is the reverse angle to the previous one. Written on the back is January 1958. To the left is the Norman Sollows wharf and building and on the right is the wharf and building on it owned Frank E Davis, managed by my grandfather, Buck Hersey. The main wharves can be seen in the background, with a building showing up on the north wharf, probably the co-op building where gas used to be pumped for the boats. Fuzzy but rare photo.

Thanks to Bryan Smith
This is a view from the south wharf, with the north wharf in the background. The postmark reads either 1902 or 1912. It is interesting to see a large keeled sailing ship at low tide. The writng on the post card asks if the receiver can recognize all of the people in the photo, would have loved to have seen the answer.

This is the harbour from the south wharf with the north wharf in the background. Several secondary wharves can be seen, the one with the red building was a big herring and fish processing plant and is the wharf shown on the previous card. Just below the boom and above the boom rope can be seen a small wharf which is the fish plant that my Grandfather, Lawrence "Buck" Hersey ran for Frank E Davis of Grand Manan. This was taken in the mid to late 1950's.

Thanks to Bryan Smith
This is a photo of that same Sollows building after its wharf and under pinng had been destroyed. I assume that this is the final wrecking crew dismantling the rest of the building. I am not sure of the date of this as I was not in the village at the time.

Thanks to Bryan Smith
This is a photo of which is identified as the Perry and Saunders store, which later became Norman Swollows store and is still there today as a building near the driveway to the property belonging to Carol Frost. Perry and Saunders ran quite a business, as can be seen by the earlier photo of their gas pumps on the north wharf.

This is the beach in the early 1900's. One can see bicycles, people and horse and cart tracks. The tide is out and there are quite a few rocks in the distance on the beach. The village on the horizon would be Beaver River. Some years no rocks appear on the beach (this year) other years quite a few appear. This is largely dependant on the weather, mostly the winds and the tides of the year.

This is the beach posted in 1934. There are many more rocks than the previous picture taken in roughly the same spot. On the horizon to the left side, the Digby Islands can be faintly seen.

Thanks to Bryan Smith
This is a "business card" advertising a fishing experience on the Bryan S, a boat owned by Cecil Smith. It was used to take day trips out deep sea fishing with a rod and reel. This started in the 50's, with two Port Maitland boats offering this service for the summer.

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